Skip Navigation Buttons    Contact   
Logo: BRS BRS/BORS First Joint MeetingLogo: BORS
Home
Committee
Programme
General
Information
Call for
Abstracts
Guidelines for
Presenters
Awards
Registration
Exhibition/
Sponsorship
Dates to remember
Downloads
Contact
Page body.

Speaker Biographies

Dr Mike Adams

   

Professor John A Kanis

Dr Frazer Anderson

 

Dr Richard Keen

Professor Nick Bishop

 

Dr John Loughlin

Dr Lynda F Bonewald

 

Professor David Marsh

Professor Cyrus Cooper

 

Dr Stephen Minger

Professor Richard Eastell

 

Dr John Newell-Price

Dr Alicia El Haj

 

Professor Ian R Reid

Dr Christopher Evans

 

Dr Jonathan Tobias

Professor John Fisher

 

Dr Marian F. Young

 

Dr Mike Adams

Mike Adams graduated in Natural Philosophy (Physics) from Edinburgh University in 1975, and followed this with a PhD in spinal mechanics from the University of Westminster. His publications mostly concern the mechanical properties of the spine, intervertebral disc (dys)function, and the mechanics of articular cartilage. In 2002 he published the book "Biomechanics of Back Pain" with Nik Bogduk, Kim Burton, and Trish Dolan. He is currently Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Anatomy at the University of Bristol.
Mike’s latest research concerns how degenerated intervertebral discs influence their adjacent vertebrae, and how injecting cement into the latter can help matters. However, the subject of his presentation in Southampton arises from years of teaching musculoskeletal biology to undergraduates. Students often ask obvious questions which the experts ignore, perhaps because they are difficult or controversial. “What is disc degeneration?” is one such question, and he intends to tackle it head-on!

Dr Frazer Anderson

Senior Lecturer in Geriatric Medicine at the University of Southampton, Dr Anderson graduated from Edinburgh University in 1986 and undertook training posts in Durham and Northumberland. He developed an interest in osteoporosis while working for Dr Roger Francis in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He moved to his current post in 1995 and has spent ten years working on large clinical trials of vitamin D and calcium supplementation for fracture prevention in older people.
 

Professor Nick Bishop

Nick Bishop has been Professor of Paediatric Bone Disease in Sheffield since 1998, having trained in Manchester and Cambridge UK, and Montreal, Canada. His main research interests are treatment strategies in osteogenesis imperfecta, other causes of osteoporosis and recurrent fractures in children, and osteoclast formation defects leading to osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis.
 

Dr Lynda Bonewald

Dr Lynda F Bonewald is a Curators' Professor and the Lee M. and William Lefkowitz Professor in the Department of Oral Biology and directs the Bone Biology Research Program. Dr. Bonewald has worked in the area of transforming growth factor beta and in the lipoxygenases but is probably best known for her research in osteocyte biology. Osteocytes are the most abundant cell in bone and may be responsible for sensing mechanical stress and signaling bone modeling and remodeling. She is Director of a program project entitled "The Effects of Mechanical Strain on Osteocyte Function". The program involves investigators at UMKC, KUMC, and UTHSC in San Antonio, Texas. This program project is composed of four projects and four cores to investigate the effects of mechanical strain on osteocyte function.

Dr. Bonewald is presently the Chair of the Advocacy Committee for ASBMR.  She previously chaired the Board of Scientific Counselors of the NIH's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and is Past President of the Association for Biomolecular Resource Facilities.  She has also been a member of the Board of Directors and the Public Affairs Executive Committee of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.  She serves on the editorial boards for the Journal for Biomolecular Techniques and now the Journal for Bone and Mineral Research and is Associate Editor for Experimental Biology and Medicine.
 

Professor Cyrus Cooper

Cyrus Cooper is Professor of Rheumatology and Director of the MRC Epidemiology Resource Centre at the University of Southampton Medical School and Southampton General Hospital in the UK.  Professor Cooper graduated from the University of Cambridge and St Bartholomew's Hospital, London in 1980, and completed his residency in 1985 at the Southampton University Hospitals. He then worked in the MRC Environmental Epidemiology Unit as an MRC Training Fellow, and at the University of Bristol as a Senior Registrar in Rheumatology.  In 1990, he won an MRC Travelling Fellowship to the Mayo Clinic, USA, where he continued his research in osteoporosis.

Cyrus Cooper returned to the UK in 1992 to take up a position as Senior Lecturer in Rheumatology and MRC Senior Clinical Scientist.  He was promoted to the foundation Chair in Rheumatology at the University of Southampton in 1997 while continuing as an MRC Senior Clinical Scientist at the MRC Environmental Epidemiology Unit.  In 2003, he was appointed Director of the MRC Epidemiology Resource Centre, University of Southampton
 

Professor Richard Eastell

Professor Eastell is Professor of Bone Metabolism at the University of Sheffield where he is also Deputy Director of the Division of Clinical Sciences (North). He is an Honorary Consultant Physician in metabolic bone disease at the Northern General Hospital, Sheffield. He qualified in medicine from Edinburgh in 1977. He trained at the Mayo Clinic under Dr B L Riggs for 5 years. He became a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of London in 1996, an honorary fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland in 1998 and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, the Royal College of Pathology and the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2000.

He is the head of the Academic Unit of Bone Metabolism Group and has an active research group into the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. He has published over 200 papers on osteoporosis and related topics. In 1997, he was awarded Hospital Doctor of the Year in the osteoporosis category, in 1998 he was awarded the Corrigan Medal of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland, and in 2003, was part of the team awarded the Queen’s Anniversary Award to the University of Sheffield for the Health and Social Care of Older People. In 2004, he was awarded the Kohn Foundation award from the National Osteoporosis Society and the Society of Endocrinology Medal. He is on the editorial board of Osteoporosis International, Osteoporosis Review, and Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. He is the President of the UK Bone Research Society and the President of the European Calcified Tissue Society. He is Deputy Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Group of the National Osteoporosis Society. He is a member of the MRC Physiological Medicine and Infections Board.
 

Dr Alicia El Haj

Alicia J El Haj received an MSc from Manchester and a PhD from Aberdeen. Following two postdoctoral positions in Medical and Veterinary Schools in Belfast and London, she took up a lectureship at Birmingham in 1989. In 1997, she moved to Keele University to develop and expand research in cell engineering as part of a new joint Medical School between Manchester and Keele. Appointed to Research Director, she was instrumental in forming and expanding the Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine. The Institute, based on campus, at the UHNS and the RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital has been rated 5A – 5* in the past 3 RAEs. The Institute research programme is at the clinical interface, with ACI ongoing, and more stem cell treatments planned in orthopaedic repair. Her research is in the field of bone cell transduction of physical processes and translating this research into connective tissue engineering and regenerative medicine funded by the BBSRC, EPSRC, Welcome and EU with extensive publications in the field. She is President of the UK Cell and Tissue Engineering Society and Member of the IFMBE Working Group for Cellular Engineering.
 

Dr Christopher Evans

Christopher Evans holds the Robert Lovett Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery at Harvard Medical School where he is Director of the Center for Molecular Orthopaedics. He obtained a B.Sc. in Genetics and Microbiology, and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wales. After a period of post-doctoral research in the Department of Molecular Biology, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium, he came to the University of Pittsburgh Medical School ending up as the Henry Mankin Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Professor, Department of Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry. While at the University of Pittsburgh he obtained a MA in the History and Philosophy of Science.

Dr Evans’s research interests focus on the application of gene therapy to treat disorders of bones and joints, a field he helped to found.

Dr Evans is immediate Past-President of the Orthopaedic Research Society and a Fellow of both the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Royal College of Pathologists.
 

Professor John Fisher

Professor John Fisher is Deputy Vice Chancellor at the University of Leeds, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. The Institute has over 80 Post Doctoral Researchers and Doctoral research students, working in the field of tissue replacement and tissue engineering, and is supported by a current external research income of over £10 million.

Professor Fisher has over 25 years experience in Medical Engineering research, and has published over 350 journal papers in this field. In the last 10 years his research has focused on wear, wear debris of artificial joints. His laboratory has over 100 functional joint simulation systems making it one of the largest research facilities worldwide. More recently novel coupled biomechanical wear and biological cell culture systems have been developed for pre clinical assessment of the functional osteolytic potential of wear debris and joint replacements. Current research also focuses on cartilage tissue substitution, spine biomechanics and tissue engineering. The work is supported by major collaborative programme funding from EPSRC (Portfolio), NIH, EU and Industry with key international collaborations in USA, Europe, China and Japan.

Professor John A Kanis

Professor Kanis is director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases at Sheffield. His interest in bone disease covers basic, clinical research, health technology assessment, epidemiology and health economics. He is an author of more than 500 scientific publications and a Royal Society of Medicine Award Winner for his Textbook on Osteoporosis. He is an Editor of Bone and sits on the Editorial Board of several peer review journals. He is a long-standing advisor for Government Departments and non-Governmental organisations in several countries. He founded the International Osteoporosis Foundation in 1988 and was Chairman of its Scientific Advisory Board until 1998. He coordinates and participates in many international research collaborations and has served on the project management team of several EC-funded research awards (eg EVOS, EPOS).
 

Dr Richard Keen

Richard Keen graduated from St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK. He is now Director of the Metabolic Bone Disease Unit at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore. Dr Keen also holds a senior lecturer appointment in rheumatology and metabolic bone diseases at the Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University College London.

Dr Keen heads a clinical research team, and is currently investigating potential new treatments for osteoporosis and other bone disorders. He is the chief investigator for the ZODIAC Study, which is assessing the role for bisphosphonates in the management of bone loss following spinal cord injury. He heads the VIDEO Study, an arc funded clinical trial examining the effect of vitamin D supplementation on symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Dr Keen also works with the media and is often quoted on medical matters relating to osteoporosis and arthritis.

Outside of medicine, Richard is married with three children. He is a keen sportsman, with his loves being cricket and rugby. He is a qualified mini/youth rugby coach, and his winter weekends are often spent running around on a wet pitch somewhere in northwest London.
 

Dr John Loughlin

Dr John Loughlin completed his PhD in developmental biology at Leeds University in 1991, before commencing his postdoctoral research in the molecular genetic analysis of monogenic diseases of the extracellular matrix at Oxford University. His postdoctoral supervisor was Professor Bryan Sykes. In 1995 Dr Loughlin went on to establish his own group and to research the genetic basis of primary osteoarthritis (OA) at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, which was situated on the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre site in Oxford. Publishing the first ever OA genome scan in 1999, Dr Loughlin and his colleagues now focus on an analysis of genes within refined regions of the genome.

Dr. Loughlin’s continuing research aims to identify and understand the causal mutations that encode for OA susceptibility. In 1997 Dr Loughlin secured a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from the Arthritis Research Campaign and in 2002 became a University Lecturer at Oxford. Dr Loughlin teaches medical genetics and supervises postgraduate and postdoctoral research scientists. He is an editorial board member of the Journal Musculoskeletal Sciences and he has given oral presentations of his group’s research at workshops, conferences and at Universities in Asia, Europe and North America.

Dr Loughlin has published widely in a number of journals including Nature Genetics, PNAS, BMJ and the American Journal of Human Genetics.
 

Professor David Marsh

Present Post: Professor of Clinical Orthopaedics, UCL, IOMS (since July 2005)
Previous Posts: Honorary Professor of Trauma and Orthopaedics,
Queen’s University, Belfast, Senior Lecturer in Orthopaedics, University of Manchester
Other Positions:
Past President of International Society for Fracture Repair
Past President of Orthopaedic Research Society
Chairman of ISFR Osteoporotic Fracture Campaign
International Ambassador for the Bone and Joint Decade
Member of Secondary Care Forum and Scientific Advisory Group, NOS
Member of IOF Committee of Scientific Advisors
Secretary of Association of Professors of Orthopaedic Surgery (APOS)
Research and Clinical Interests:
Osteoporosis and fragility fractures
Biology of fracture healing
Clinical trials of fracture treatment
Treatment of fracture non-union
Osteoporosis action in UK:
Lead Author of the BOA ‘Blue Book’ on Osteoporosis and Fragility Fractures
Member of ‘Invest in your Bones’ – collaboration between, BOA, NOS, IOF, BGS(Geriatrics) and industrial partners
Chairman of Executive National Hip Fracture Project
 

Dr Stephen Minger

Dr Stephen Minger is the Director of the Stem Cell Biology Laboratory and a Senior Lecturer in the new Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases at King's College London. Dr Minger received his PhD in Pathology (Neurosciences) in 1992 from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. From 1992-1994, he was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego, where he first began to pursue research in neural stem cell biology. In 1995, Dr Minger was appointed an Assistant Professor in Neurology at The University of Kentucky Medical School. He moved his stem cell research programme to Guy’s Hospital in 1996 and was appointed a Lecturer in Biomolecular Sciences at King's College London in 1998. Over the last 15 years, his research group has worked with a wide range of somatic stem cell populations, as well as mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells. In 2002, together with Dr Susan Pickering and Professor Peter Braude, Dr Minger was awarded one of the first two licenses granted by the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority for the derivation of human ES cells. His group subsequently generated the first human embryonic stem cell line in the UK and was one of the first groups to deposit this into the UK Stem Cell Bank. They have gone on to generate three new human ES cell lines, including one that encodes the most common genetic mutation resulting in Cystic Fibrosis.

In addition to the derivation of human ES cell lines, the Stem Cell Biology Laboratory is focused on the generation of a number of therapeutically relevant human somatic stem cell populations from embryonic stem cells. These include cardiac, vascular, retinal, and neural stem/progenitor cell populations, as well pancreatic ?-cells and oligodendrocyte progenitors. Dr Minger has established highly productive collaborations with a number of specialist groups in many areas of clinical interest throughout the UK, and is one of the co-organisers of the London Regenerative Medicine Network, a grass-roots, research-led organisation designed to stimulate clinical translation of cell- and gene-based therapies within London. He is also the Senior Editor of Regenerative Medicine, a new journal launched in Jan 2006 by Future Medicines.

Dr Minger’s research is supported by the UK Medical Research Council, The European Union, The Oliver Bird Foundation, The Wellcome Trust, The UK Department of Trade and Industry, The Charitable Foundation of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals, the BBSRC, and the EPSRC amongst others.
 

Dr John Newell-Price

Dr John Newell-Price graduated in Medicine from Cambridge University in 1990. He underwent training in Endocrinology at St Bartholomew’s Hospital: from 1993 as a Lecturer, and was an MRC Training Fellow from 1995-8 whilst doing his PhD. Since April 2000 he has been Senior Lecturer in Endocrinology at University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospital Trust, and was elected FRCP in 2004. His specialist clinical interest is in pituitary disease, Cushing’s syndrome and neuroendocrine tumours, and basic science interest is in the regulation of hormonal gene expression, and in particular epigenetic mechanisms involved in gene silencing.
 

Professor Ian R Reid

Ian Reid MD is Professor of Medicine and Endocrinology at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. His research interests include the pathogenesis and management of osteoporosis, primary hyperparathyroidism & Paget’s disease, and his research group has been active in the identification of novel regulators of bone cell function. He is President of the International Bone and Mineral Society, Secretary of the Asian Pacific Osteoporosis Foundation, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand.
 

Dr Jonathan Tobias

Jonathan Tobias is a Reader in rheumatology at University of Bristol, and consultant rheumatologist at Bristol Royal Infirmary, where he has been based since 1995. His undergraduate studies in medicine were at Cambridge University and London University from where he qualified in 1984, followed by MD and PhD theses in bone biology which he completed in 1990 and 1994 respectively, at St George’s Hospital Medical School, London. His research, which has led to 49 original research papers and 18 book chapters and reviews, focuses on the regulation of osteoblast activity by estrogen receptors and other anabolic factors, the management of osteoporosis in adults, and the factors which influence bone development in childhood. He has extensive clinical experience in treating patients with osteoporosis, and in running DXA-based osteoporosis diagnostic services. He serves on the editorial board of Calcified Tissue International, the scientific program committees of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, the British Society for Rheumatology and National Osteoporosis Society, and on the research committee of the Arthritis Research Campaign. He is also treasurer of the Bone Research Society.
 

Dr Marian F. Young

Marian F. Young is Chief of the Molecular Biology of Bones and Teeth Section in the Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases Branch of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. She received her BS from SUNY at Oneonta, NY (1976), and her PhD in Developmental Biology from the Department of Genetics and Cell Biology at the University of Connecticut (1981). After a fellowship in the Lab of Developmental Biology and Anomalies at the NIDR (1981-1983) Dr. Young headed a group in the Mineralized Tissue Research Branch also at the NIDR where she began her investigations on the molecular biology and function of ECM proteins in skeletal tissues. Her current research focuses on regulation and function of small proteoglycans in mineralized tissues and in their potential role in controlling pathological skeletal conditions such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and ectopic ossification. Dr. Young has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles and numerous reviews and book chapters on the molecular biology of ECM in mineralizing tissue.
 

Page Footer. Contact